Friday, September 26, 2008

In His hands

For some time, what with all the partisan rhetoric surrounding the Presidential campaign, a thought has been on my mind that I’ve wanted to voice. It is this: When it comes to the well-being of my family, my livelihood, my personal sense of happiness and wholeness, I have never felt that I have been either helped or hindered because who was in the White House.

For instance, there are many within the Black community who consider the Reagan years to be bad years for Black people (and, right now, unfortunately, George W. Bush might hold that distinction). Nevertheless, I can’t say I share this opinion. I started college during Ronald Reagan’s first year in office and finished graduate school during his second term. I graduated from the university debt free, my great-grandfather having paid my way through college with the savings bonds he had accumulated during the nearly 30 years he worked as a janitor. By the time Reagan left office, I was working my first teaching job, earning a decent teacher salary, and had recently purchased my first new car.

God graciously and abundantly blessed me during the Reagan years.

On the other side of the political fence, some within Evangelicalism consider the eight years President Bill Clinton was in office to have been a low point in this nation. Yet, I don’t have particularly bad memories of the Clinton years, either. During President Clinton’s tenure in office I received full ordination to the gospel ministry and had the privilege of ministering to many people within my former denominational circles. It was also during these years that Catherine gave birth to our two precious sons. During this era, God also provided for the needs of our growing family by providing a custom-made music position for me at one of the top public high schools in our area, and enabled Catherine and me to purchase a brand new house (in which we still live) and buy two new cars (which we still drive).

God graciously and abundantly blessed us during the Clinton years.

Even under the current administration of President George W. Bush, with much of the country genuinely anxious about the economy, God has supplied our financial needs. We don’t have a lot, but we have all we need. God has been so good.

Here’s my point: Who won or lost the Presidential election never had anything to do with the well-being of my family. We’re in God’s hands. He has not changed, nor has He failed.

For this reason, I can’t help but wonder why some Christians speak and act as if John McCain winning the Presidency would either be the best or the worst thing to happen to our country, while other Christians speak and act as if electing Barack Obama would either be the salvation or the ruin of our nation. Our nation, its leaders, and our lives, are in the hands of God. Why don’t we speak and act as those who trust God to work in all circumstances to accomplish His good purpose?

At this point, I’m 99% certain for whom I will vote in November. Yet, if my candidate wins, I’m not expecting miracles from him; I look to God to supply my family’s needs. And, if my candidate loses, it’s not the end of the world: God is still on the throne, my family and my future are in God’s hands and, because that's true, we’ll be all right.

So, I ask again, why don’t we evangelicals speak and act as those who really trust God?

2 comments:

doxologica said...

"...I can’t help but wonder why some Christians speak and act as if John McCain winning the Presidency would either be the best or the worst thing to happen to our country, while other Christians speak and act as if electing Barack Obama would either be the salvation or the ruin of our nation."

It seems very unhealthy. I know of Christian friends who have stated that they would move out of the country if Obama was elected. I think it is a sign of trusting in the wrong type of authority. I'm excited that we may have our first black president tomorrow. But, I am terribly grieved that it would have to be a man who is radically pro-abortion. The benefit of being a Christian is that either way, we'll still sleep well tomorrow night.

David G. said...

Please!!

Abortion is nothing compared to the worldly human suffering going on in the U.S., and other nations.

The continent of Africa suffers everyday from Dictatorial regimes who claim everything is What their god wants, and expects, while torturing it's own citizens to comply with the Govt's wishes.

The sad sick truth is that God seems to be missing in these societies, brought on by a twisted post colonial so-called logic, that includes old tribal folklore.